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Chance the Rapper Brings ‘Magnificent Coloring World’ to Big Screen 

His partnership with AMC marks the first time a music artist has worked with the theatre chain to self-distribute a film 

Art & Entertainment

By: ShaCamree Gowdy

Chance the Rapper is taking his concert to the big screen. 

The rapper is commemorating the five-year anniversary of Coloring Book, which earned him three Grammys and became the first streaming-only album to win best rap album. A concert film will premiere Aug. 13 in select AMC Theatres, per The Associated Press. 

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Magnificent Coloring World was filmed in Chance’s hometown of Chicago in 2017 during his tour of the same name. 

Chance told the Associated Press that he chose a big screen, full concert experience over a streaming service because “there’s just something different about going to see something in theaters, instead of watching it in your bed or whatever.” 

“The appreciation for Chance’s dazzling creation is a genuine demonstration of the power and emotional connection audiences have with Chance, and how they feel while watching his work on the big screens of AMC,” said Adam Aron, CEO and President of AMC Entertainment, per AP. “This is a reminder of the uncharted programming possibilities at AMC, and we are thrilled to blaze this path with Chance the Rapper and his team.” 

Magnificent Coloring World was shot in three and a half weeks and showcases a variety of sets built by Chance himself. The rapper led the film’s editing process and said he wanted to tell a different story with each frame, drawing inspiration from previous musicals and concert films like Roger Waters: The Wall from 2014 and Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker from 1988, per AP. 

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The rapper hopes to do more behind-the-scenes work in the coming years. 

“Watching a performance of mine from four years ago, I’m like ‘I would have done this’ or ‘I would have done that,’” he told AP. “I’m saying to myself ‘I can’t wait to perform this particular song now.’ I’m looking at it as a performer, but also as a filmmaker.”