Termarr Johnson: ‘I Want To Be Remembered as One of the Best Baseball Players’

In Summary

The 5-foot-10, 175-pound left-handed shortstop-second baseman is one of the top prospects in the 2022 MLB Draft.

Termarr Johnson is one of the most intriguing baseball prospects coming out of the class of 2022. The 5-foot-10, 175-pound left-handed shortstop-second baseman is from Atlanta, Georgia, and attends Benjamin Mays High School. According to Talk Up APS, a blog of Atlanta Public Schools, he has been ranked the No. 1 baseball player in the country. 

Additionally, Johnson was named a 2021 Perfect Game All-American. He is very fortunate to be one of the 60 top high school senior baseball players in America. He won a gold medal when he was a member of the 2019 USA Baseball 15U team, for players 15 and under. 

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Johnson has been playing baseball since he was a little kid as all of his brothers played the sport. He had an opportunity to play with his brother Trevell on the Benjamin Hays baseball team. 

“Playing with Tervell was amazing. I’ve been playing with him ever since I was a little kid. He’s helped me through everything just learning how to be a better teammate, a better baseball player and just taking me under my wing and just helping me be a better player,” Johnson said. 

Growing up, his favorite baseball players were Matt Kemp, Jason Heyward and Robinson Cano. Scouts have said that Johnson is a very good hitter, and he likes to model his game after Cano. 

“Just watching him as a kid, I always wanted to have his sweet swing. That’s everything I just have been chasing ever since I was a kid. My approach is always came from me just watching my brothers. I watch them hit and how they would take pitches and how to take control of everything,” he said. “I always wanted to do that and they helped me learn how to do that and made me a better player.” 

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The MLB has seen a major decline in African American players, with only 7% of Black players on an MLB roster in 2021. Johnson believes that baseball could create more programs and have more role models even though he sees the Breakthrough Series and Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities as good programs.  

“In basketball, you see a lot of guys like me who ball in are successful. In football too, you see a lot of guys who are successful and guys want to be like that but not so much in baseball,” said Johnson. 

He is grateful for the Benjamin Mays baseball team for preparing him to being a better baseball player, teammate and leader. 

“For me honestly, I just want to be a baseball player. It doesn’t matter if I get drafted in the 40th round or first round. I just want to be a baseball player. It doesn’t matter what route I go,” Johnson said. “I really don’t know my route but at the end of the day, I want to be a baseball player and be one of the best baseball players to play the game.” 

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MLB compared to other sports is very reliant on their development systems. Johnson believes that Mays has prepared him for the minor leagues. When it’s all said and done, he wants to be remembered as one of the best baseball players, one of the greatest role models and most importantly, a good person. 

“I don’t want anybody to have any bad blood between me ‘cause at the end of the day, I feel like it’s more important for me to be a good person more than a good baseball player… When I look back on my career, I want to be looked at as that type of person and that type of baseball player.” 

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