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Voting Rights Activists Arrested After March on Capitol Hill

This comes one week after Black women leaders were arrested during a march to the U.S. Senate to protest restrictive voting legislation

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Several voting rights activists were arrested at a Brothers Day of Action on Capitol Hill.
By: Alyssa Wilson

Several voting rights activists were arrested on Capitol Hill after marching for Brothers Day of Action.  

The demonstration, being held by several key groups including Black Voters Matter, was part of a rallying cry by Black and Democratic legislators to protect the right to free and fair elections.  

RELATED: Black Women Leaders Arrested During March to Protect Voting Rights  

Several hours after the march, demonstrators were caught on camera being handcuffed and escorted away in Capitol Police vehicles.  

Cliff Albright, the Executive Director of Black Voters Matter, was among the men arrested. The organization tweeted about his arrest, questioning why rioters who attacked the Capitol during the January insurrection were not met with the same treatment.  

RELATED: Prosecutor: Rep. Park Cannon Won’t Be Charged For Election Protest   

One week prior, civil rights groups held a day of action on the steps of the United States Senate, calling for the passage of national voting reform legislation and an end to the filibuster. More than 40 groups, many led by Black women, stood in the nation’s capital to urge members of Congress to pass the For the People Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Act. The groups want these bills to override a wave of voting bills in Republican-led states meant to tighten access to the ballot box.   

RELATED: Texas Democrats Head to DC to Prevent Restrictive Voting Bill From Being Passed   

The attack on voting rights began after former President Donald Trump and some Republican lawmakers falsely claimed the 2020 presidential election was stolen. By mid-February, 253 bills across 43 states were proposed to tighten access to voting. By May, the number rose to 389 bills in 48 states, The Washington Post reported.   

If you or someone you know is struggling from trauma triggered by this story, resources are available here.